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Mon, March 08

Community information: What to expect after getting a COVID-19 vaccine

This May 4, 2020, file photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, shows the first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. Pfizer announced Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, more results in its ongoing coronavirus vaccine study that suggest the shots are 95% effective a month after the first dose. (Courtesy of University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP, File)

This May 4, 2020, file photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, shows the first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. Pfizer announced Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, more results in its ongoing coronavirus vaccine study that suggest the shots are 95% effective a month after the first dose. (Courtesy of University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP, File)

According to county health officials and the Center Disease Control and Prevention, COVID-19 vaccinations will help protect you from catching the coronavirus.

Those who get the vaccine may have some side effects, which are normal signs that the body is building protection. Side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but should go away in a few days.

Common side effects include:

Pain and swelling in the arm where you get the shot and fever, chills, tiredness and headaches throughout the rest of your body.

When to call the doctor

In most cases, discomfort from fever or pain is normal.

• If the redness or tenderness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours or

• If your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days, you should contact your doctor.

Some people experience more severe side effects after the second dose.

The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines are administered in two doses, spaced apart by about 28 and 21 days, respectively.

More users of V-safe, the CDC's tool to report vaccine side effects, reported side effects within a week of getting their second shot compared to the first, according to a Jan. 27 CDC update.

Coconino County vaccine distribution

According to ADHS, there has been 35,040 COVID-19 vaccines administered with 26,969 first doses, and 8,215 second doses.

On Feb. 14, the county opened appointments for essential employees in the Phase 1b category.

Phase 1b populations now include power and utility workers, food and agriculture related occupations (packaging and distribution workers, grocery and restaurant workers), transportation and material moving occupations (public transportation providers, airlines, gas stations, auto shop workers, and other transportation network providers), state and local government workers that provide critical services for continuity of government, other essential workers (e.g., business and financial services, supply chain for critical goods, funeral services, critical traders, etc.) and adults with high risk medical conditions living in shelter or other congregate living settings.

Proof of eligibility within the Phase 1a and Phase 1b is required.

Those seeking vaccination are asked to bring proof of occupation such as a paystub, employment badge, a letter from an employer, or a driver’s license or ID displaying a date of birth. Those without proper eligibility identification may be turned away.

More information on the COVID-19 vaccine in Coconino County, the phases of vaccine distribution and locations is available at coconino.az.gov/covid19vaccine.

The Fort Tuthill vaccination site is currently open to the defined eligible groups and is not open to the general public.

The exact timeline of vaccine distribution among Phase 1 priority groups and Phase 2 and 3 remaining populations will depend on factors such as how many vaccine types have been approved, how many doses have been manufactured and allocated to Coconino County, how many individuals decide to get vaccinated, and other logistical factors. As more vaccine is available to more groups of people, more locations will open to provide vaccine.

More information on the COVID-19 vaccine in Coconino County, the phases of vaccine distribution and locations is available at coconino.az.gov/covid19vaccine.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, as of Feb. 15, more than 52,884,356 COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in the U.S.

In Arizona, there has been a total of 1,217,126 vaccines administered.

On the Navajo Nation, which is one of the hardest hit populations in Arizona, a total of 82,533 vaccines have been administered. The Navajo Nation is the second largest Native American reservation in the U.S. with more than 298,000 enrolled members and 173,000 Navajos living within the reservation borders.

Information provided by Coconino County, Yavapai County and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

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