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Fri, Nov. 27

Tight rope balance: Grand Canyon teams train at Hermits Road

Grand Canyon National Park Search and Rescue conduct highline training over a section of the Grand Canyon along Hermits Road in November. (NPS Photos/A. Marini)

Grand Canyon National Park Search and Rescue conduct highline training over a section of the Grand Canyon along Hermits Road in November. (NPS Photos/A. Marini)

GRAND CANYON, Ariz. — Those traveling on Hermit Road in Grand Canyon National Park last week may have noticed ropes strung across a section of the Canyon, and perhaps some folks dangling from those lines. This was part of highline training conducted by the National Park Service.

According to the park, highline training develops skills that are useful for technical rope rescue teams at Grand Canyon.

“Often times, the best way to get to something or someone over the edge is by descending the cliffs above,” the park stated. “Other times, it may be easier to hike a trail to provide assistance. Either way, our search and rescue team is highly-trained and ready to assist at a moment’s notice.”

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Grand Canyon National Park Search and Rescue conduct highline training over a section of the Grand Canyon along Hermits Road in November. (NPS Photos/A. Marini)

Highlines provide access to crevasses or slot canyons that would be otherwise difficult to access. During the process, ropes are secured on either side of the Canyon — safety practices are put in place to ensure redundancy of the ropes system. Rangers are then lowered down into the Canyon from the middle of the highline to practice accessing a patient below.

“The Grand Canyon Emergency Services team trains hard to provide efficient and timely responses to our visitors and keep their skills sharp,” the park stated.

Information provided by NPS

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