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Opry Night back Friday, proceeds to help build Habitat house

Sabrina Sartor (left) and Barb Parenteau display some of the raffle prizes available at Opry Night Friday at the Williams Rodeo Barn. Proceeds benefit Williams Habitat for Humanity. Submitted photo

Sabrina Sartor (left) and Barb Parenteau display some of the raffle prizes available at Opry Night Friday at the Williams Rodeo Barn. Proceeds benefit Williams Habitat for Humanity. Submitted photo

WILLIAMS, Ariz. - Williams residents can enjoy great music while supporting a great cause at this week's Grand Opry Night.

The fun starts at 6:30 p.m. Friday Oct. 10 in the Rodeo Barn. Money from the event goes to Williams Habitat for Humanity.

Besides the music, event goers can enjoy food, a cakewalk and raffles. Admission is $6 for adults and $3 for seniors.

The Williams Opry Band returns this year with some new members to provide the entertainment. The new lineup includes Patrick O'Brien, Daniel Abbot, James Justham, Pamelia La Paglia and Debi Campbell.

Other performers include Beverly Jones and Cameron Haney. The Opry Band and singers will perform country western and gospel music.

Organizer Bud Parenteau expects about 20-30 cakes for the cakewalk.

"That's always a real fun thing," he said. "They're all donated by members of the community."

As for the food, hot dogs, popcorn, water and soda will be for sale at the event.

Opry Night attendees can also win one of more than 70 items that will be available as raffle items. Prizes include four tickets to Disneyland, an airplane ride over the Grand Canyon, six Grand Canyon Railway train rides, a ladies leather jacket donated by De Berge Saddlery and Western Outfitters, gift cards for restaurants in Williams and Flagstaff, pictures from Colors of the West, and handmade jewelry.

The money raised at Opry Night will go toward building Habitat for Humanity's third home. The house will be located on Wells Fargo Drive and construction will start as soon as the city's water crisis is resolved.

"It's going to be the first house on that cul de sac," Parenteau said. "We're ready to build. We have the family, we have the land, we have the money, and we can't do it because the city can't give us a permit."

Habitat for Humanity is an international organization that has built more than 500,000 affordable homes for low-income families since it was founded in 1976.

The Williams chapter started in 1995. The organization completed its first house in 2005 and its second house in 2012.

"The look on people's faces when you give them the keys is priceless," Parenteau said. "It's really going to help a neat family."

All families who receive a Habitat for Humanity house must put in 500 hours of sweat equity. Families must apply to receive a Habitat for Humanity home. A committee selects the families "based on their level of need, their willingness to become partners in the program and their ability to repay the loan," according to the organization's website.

Parenteau encouraged community members to come out to the Opry Night in support of Habitat for Humanity.

"It's a great family night out and everybody has a good time, and you might even walk away with a prize or two," he said.

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