This month in Williams history: August 2, 1918

A restored Hupmobile similar to the type stolen from Peach Springs in August 1918. (Photo/ Peter Turvey)

A restored Hupmobile similar to the type stolen from Peach Springs in August 1918. (Photo/ Peter Turvey)

This month in Williams history

August 2, 1918

Prisoner escapes train

Jack Beach, a man wanted for cattle stealing, was apprehended in Kingman and was being transported to New Mexico when he leaped through a window of the train near Williams.

As the train passed Nevin, a station east of Williams, the prisoner leaped across the coach and dove headforemost thru an open window. He rolled down the embankment, quickly arose and disappeared in the dusk.

Local officers joined in the search for the fugitive, and all residents of Garland Prairie were warned of his presence. All efforts to locate him failed at last reports.

Car thief caught in Colorado

The pumper at Peach Springs discovered that his brand new Hup Sedan had been replaced by a well-worn Ford without a license plate. Now its bad enough to lose any sort of a car, but when it comes to those new type Hup Sixes, well, if you've seen one, you know!

The unlucky owner fortunately knew his engine number to be 20-490. Deputy Sheriff Holden in Lamar, Colorado wired the Sheriff in Williams telling him that he was holding five men and a Hup mobile sedan.

Holden wired back and said the car was the missing one and the thief confessed to the stealing of a Ford sedan and the Hup.

Graves moved for road

The town of Williams is moving graves in the old cemetery north of the box factory, that interfere with the right-of-way recently surveyed for the State Highway.

It will be necessary to remove six or seven bodies which will be placed in the new cemetery. The other graves, nearly a hundred in number, will be left undisturbed. most of these are without markers.

The old cemetery was opened in the year 1884 but its use was discontinued when the present beautiful Odd Fellow and K.P. cemetery was secured.

Lightning kills sheepherder

Meletone Ortega was kill by lightning July 31, during the big storm that could be seen from Williams. He was a Mexican sheepherder near Anita, at Benedict's camp.

The lightning went thru his tent, and down his side, stripping him almost bare, except for a portion of his underclothing.

The same bolt also killed his burro and his dog, and burned the tent and everything in it.

A coroners jury went out from Williams Aug. 1, and returned at midnight bringing the body with them.

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