Territory pioneers of Williams and Ash Fork region

A family history by Ash Fork resident Lewis D. Hume

Lewis Hume’s grandmother, Elizabeth Lewis. Submitted photo

Lewis Hume’s grandmother, Elizabeth Lewis. Submitted photo

My great grandmother Anna Mary Doyle was born in Wexford, Ireland, February 25, 1838. When she was 5-years-old, she came to America by ship and landed in Boston, Mass. It was during the Great Migration caused by Ireland's potato famine. Anna Mary Doyle married her first husband, Jonas Richardson, and records show they made their home in Quincy, Ill. for some time. My grandmother Elizabeth was born in Quincy, Ill. in 1863. Her father Jonas was killed in the Civil War.

Anna Mary Doyle then married Malachi Crow sometime prior to 1870 and the westward adventure began.

Anna Mary Doyle arrived in Williams, Ariz. by wagon in 1881.

Her husband Malachi Crow, through second marriage had followed the construction of the Atlantic/Pacific Railroad. He worked as a contractor as the railroad moved west across northern Arizona.

With the beauty of Williams, their decision was made to make their home here and to stay in the area.

The family consisted of five children and my grandmother Elizabeth was the oldest. Daniel Crowe was born in 1870, died May 30, 1898 in Williams of consumption. Then Mattie and Anna Bell. Edward the youngest was born in a wagon on the journey west from Missouri.

My grandmother Elizabeth married Thomas Cooper Lewis, Nov.14, 1899 in Flagstaff, Ariz. at the Nativity Catholic Church.

Since my grandfather Thomas Cooper Lewis was one of the first businessmen of Ash Fork, it was decided to make their home here.

With her daughter settled in Ash Fork with family, her mother Anna Mary moved down to also make her home in Ash Fork, as her years were advancing.

Anna Mary died April 6, 1910 and buried in the Ash Fork Settlers Cemetery.

My mother Anna Lewis was born June 26, 1901 in Ash Fork and lived most of her life there.

Anna Lewis married my father, Roy Sidney Hume, in 1931. Sometime later they moved to Williams and my father rode the trails for the National Park Service and during the summer of 1936 he moved his family to the bottom of the Grand Canyon and resided at the Old Civilian Conservation Corps Camp. "A most memorable time of our lives."

Anna Mary Doyle and Elizabeth were true pioneers and some of the first residents of Williams. My family, over the years has had a strong presence in Williams.

• My Uncle Ray Hume hauled logs for the Saginaw Manistee Lumber Co.

• My cousins Jack and Fern Tipton lived and worked for Ben Perkins at Pine Flat and Sand Flat for over 20 years during the 1920s and 30s.

• My oldest sister Patricia and husband Marvin Kypfer (Skinner) lived and raised their family in Williams.

• My youngest sister Kathryn married Cachie Gonzalez, owner of Pine Crest Dairy. Their children, Peter, Danny, and Marcianna were all born in Williams.

• My oldest child Roy was born in the Williams hospital, all my sons played ball and learned to swim in the old Williams swimming pool.

Through many friends and shared experiences, Williams is still a large part of my family's life.

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