Community members can be a dog's best friend

Manny Araujo takes on MTR's project management

Submitted photo <br>
From left, Manny Araujo, Robynn Eckel, Patty Anthony and Jerry Anthony. Araujo has agreed to spearhead construction plans for Meant to Rescue’s animal holding facilty.

Submitted photo <br> From left, Manny Araujo, Robynn Eckel, Patty Anthony and Jerry Anthony. Araujo has agreed to spearhead construction plans for Meant to Rescue’s animal holding facilty.

WILLIAMS - Falling in love with just one special dog can be the catalyst towards making a difference, which is why Manny Araujo with OneSource Refrigeration, Heating and Air Conditioning agreed to take on the project management side of SAVE - Meant To Rescue's, (MTR) plan to build a no-kill holding facility in Williams.

"I really care about my little guy," he said. "I remember when I was out looking for dogs, going to the pound, and it was pretty sad. It really did affect me. I never thought about what happens to them."

So when MTR's founder, Robynn Eckel asked Araujo for help, he was on it right away, agreeing to contribute the facility's heating and cooling system.

"We need the community to know this is actually rolling and that this is actually on track," he said. "I'm going to be in charge of getting the workforce and the suppliers that are going to hopefully be donating supplies together and on track."

Over the past four years, Robynn Eckel, founder of the MTR non-profit, has garnered enough backing from the community to slowly make the building become a reality. Through fundraisers and persistence, she has been able to secure land, blueprints, construction volunteers and building materials.

The problem is, after securing promises of construction from local contractors, what's next?

And that's where Araujo comes in; finally allowing the group a collective sigh of relief.

"I am absolutely overwhelmed," Eckel said. "Now I see a light at the end of the tunnel. I finally have someone helping us who is knowledgeable instead of us girls going out there with shovels and rakes."

Araujo said one of the hardest things is getting everyone together to start the project and right now, time is of the essence. If the winter season begins without the facilities' walls up and concrete down, people start dispersing.

"That is the most important thing now," Araujo said. "Getting supplies, getting those orders. Robynn already has a $20,000 promise from the city; we can put that to good use and have everything on track."

The next step for Araujo is to generate letters and talk with contractors to get an idea of who's on board.

"We need contractors who can actually afford to donate, like the whole plumbing for the building," he said. "We need to get the word out that it is actually starting, for real."

To contact Araujo call (928) 635-1117.

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